The Rise of Magicks by Nora Roberts – Book

From a Google Image Search – Goodreads

Although I found fault with the adolescent atmospherics in the second book in Nora Roberts most recent trilogy which began with Year One and continued with Of Blood and Bone, I decided that I enjoyed the first two books enough to want to read The Rise of Magicks, the last volume in the trilogy. (It could just be that, like Sheldon Cooper in The Big Bang Theory, I am unable to leave something unfinished.) I liked this last volume almost as much as I liked the first volume. Although I don’t believe in magic or even ‘magicks’, there was enough universal cultural commentary relevant to the times to keep me hooked. And I will confess that one of my guilty pleasures when it comes to reading was a love of the romance genre, especially the Regency romances of Barbara Cartland and Amanda Quick. I blame this on (or credit this to) my sister who loved these books so much. Although I rarely crave this particular genre these days, I’m guessing that particular endorphin pathway is still neurologically strong. Nora Roberts trilogy has enough romance to reengage those particular neurons and she does it with all the delicacy some of those Regency romances entailed. 

When the seal that holds magick away from humans is broken in Scotland and both good and evil magic are loosed on the world they come in the form of a virus. Many die from this virus, millions, and the world is thrown into chaos. Some humans begin to learn that they have morphed into magical beings and some other humans, who have no magic are horrified by these magical humans and see them as abominations. They capture them and put them in containment centers where they devise experiments with various deviant purposes. So we have a culture that is dealing with the ‘others’, aliens, and it is not a proud moment in fictional human history, but which has some parallels in the real world.

Lana and Max, the first generation heroes, are witches who are being hunted by a group called the Purity Warriors, and by magical people who chose the dark side, the Dark Uncanny. They decide to halt their desperate escape at a small town which they, along with other first generation virus survivors, will turn into a community called New Hope. But this final book is the story of Lana and Max’s daughter, Fallon Swift, known far and wide as The One. And she is a refreshingly down-to-earth female heroine even though she is trained by her own Merlin and her path to power resembles the Arthurian legends (but this Arthur is a girl/woman). This final book in the trilogy, The Rise of Magicks is full of war and of love. This time Duncan and Fallon are grown-ups, no longer teens, and if you were frustrated that they each went their own way at the end of Book 2, then you will find it was worth the wait. While these are not the great American novel(s) they are an entertaining and addictive read delivered by a really talented, and very prolific, writer.

December 2019 Book List

December 2019 Book List

I decided not to put together a book list for December, although I may do that later when life slows down. But here are links to lists of the best books of 2019.

New York Times

Amazon

Publisher’s Weekly (You may have. to paste this link into your search space and you may have to subscribe to a newsletter.)

https://best-books.publishersweekly.com/pw/best-books/2019

The Testaments by Margaret Atwood – Book

The Testaments by Margaret Atwood is the sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale, much anticipated (possibly demanded) by fans of the TV series based on Ms. Atwood’s book. By the end of The Handmaid’s Tale we know that there is a resistance movement. It is modeled on the real and desperate escape route for American slaves, the Underground Railroad. This time it is called the “Female Road” and the magic rescue word offered to handmaid’s, who are virtually sex slaves, is May Day. Offred escapes Gilead through this underground route. But what happens after she escapes? Does she die? Does she find a safe place and live out her days in peace? Does she join the resistance?

Margaret Atwood is able to use her words to build scenes from both the past and the future that are vivid and that come to life in our minds. She builds the entire nation of Gilead. She does it like one of those artists who can capture the essence of a person or a place with just a few deft strokes. We find we don’t need every little detail. Because her new nation is similar to things we already know our mind fills in the blanks. The same skill is at work as we follow the resistance movement inside and outside of Gilead, and as a very surprising character engineers the demise of Gilead.

Gilead has besides the handmaids; the Commanders, their wives, the Marthas, the Econowives, the Aunts, the Guardians, and the Eyes. The Aunts are modelled somewhat on nuns. They live regimented lives, ruled by prayers and bells, they are the teachers of handmaids and of the daughters of Commanders, they are the only women in Gilead allowed to keep books and to read and write. Big mistake. In this male-dominated world men believe that women are now powerless, completely reliant on men, and that even the powers of previously educated, professional women such as doctors, lawyers, and judges have been completely defused. In The Testaments we find Commander Judd and Aunt Lydia basically in a respectful/hostile power struggle. Aunt Lydia was a force in The Handmaid’s Tale, but in The Testaments we learn about her secret powers (no magic is involved, just intellect). We learn that what Commander Judd cannot imagine will eventually bring him down.

We also meet a young teen who is living with a couple of resistance fighters who she almost believes are her real parents. We meet the Pearl Girls, missionaries from Gilead who are also unwitting partners in the resistance. When Gilead uncovers “Nicole’s” parents and blows them up Nicole (Baby Nicole was stolen from Gilead) is hurriedly trained to infiltrate Gilead as a captive of the Pearl Girls. Watching her reactions as she is introduced to this repressed culture and watching the reactions of the others to her is part of that charming skill that Margaret Atwood brings to her writing. Atwood successfully, but not exhaustively, wraps up the tale of the handmaids and offers us a new hero, a woman, of course.

Photo Credit – From a Google Image Search

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood – Book

From a Google Image Search – Secret Safe Books

As it had been many years since I read The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, I wanted to read it again before I read her new sequel, The TestamentsThe Handmaid’s Tale was written in times when women’s reproductive rights were a hot topic, although not at the height of the women’s consciousness movement. The birth control pill was greeted by women with relief and sighs for the freedom it gave women to avoid unwanted pregnancies. It also seemed to offer women the same sexual freedom that men exercised, although that freedom proved to be somewhat more illusory than women thought for a number of reasons, some having to do with the fact that we still live in a male-dominated society, some having to do with sexually transmitted diseases, and some having to do with social disapproval and the need to maintain a “good” reputation. The pill was greeted very differently by the church, especially the Catholic Church and the Pope. In 1973 the Supreme Court allowed for legal abortions in the United States in the now famous/infamous Roe v Wade decision and the reactions of women and the church were pretty much a repeat of the reactions to the birth control pill. I know – all this history – what a way to make a really good story really boring. The actual history is important, however, to any deep understanding of this very original tale. These women’s rights were always controversial although The Handmaid’s Tale was written in 1985, when these new rights for women were less startling. 

I like science fiction and The Handmaid’s Tale is, in a way science fiction and it is certainly dystopian. It predicts a time in near-future America when men of religious faith decide that the new freedoms for women are not what God intended. Women are not meant to be equal to men. They are meant to be wives and mothers and submissive to their husbands. These men stage a revolution against the United States of America. They manage to kill the president, scatter Congress and nullify the US Constitution. They win enough territory in the middle of America and most southern states, except Maine, California, Florida and Texas, to form a new nation, the nation of Gilead.

Offred is a handmaid in the new nation of Gilead. She used to be a free American woman who was having an affair with Luke, a married man, who later divorced his first wife and married her (I tried to find her original name but did not find it). They had two children. Venereal disease and a viral weapon against mumps had rendered many men sterile and women often had problems conceiving or delivering healthy offspring. Population was declining. Women who had borne healthy babies were very desirable to the new nation of Gilead. They would suspend women’s ID cards and credit cards and make them unemployable and then they would kidnap them and reeducate them to be Handmaids in Gilead. It is not easy to turn a woman who has experienced freedom into what is basically a sex slave in a distinctive red habit hemmed in by about a million rules and almost as many Eyes (spies). Offred is not a happy camper. 

Of course you may have watched the TV series which I have not seen yet, but you really ought to read the book. It’s a classic. Choosing a name that would have fit right into Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales was not an accident. Here we are, almost 50 years after the Supreme Court made it legal to have an abortion, woman’s choice, and we still find concerted efforts, trickier but less militant, to overturn women’s rights to make important decisions about their own reproduction. We find many states passing laws that force clinics to comply with regulations that large hospitals can barely afford to comply with and when the clinics cannot meet the new requirements the clinics must close (TRAP laws), We find Evangelical churches that argue that even contraception is against God’s law. Federal courts are being stuffed with Conservative judges using as bait the overturning of Roe v Wade, and now marriage freedom. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood has never been more relevant.

November 2019 Book List

November 2019 Book List

I have a recurring dream. I am escorted to a well-appointed studio apartment with all the new books for the month piled on every available surface. I am given a key, a valet robot who can cook and clean, and an AI virtual presence to handle my business and social interactions. I can read as long as I like but I can’t take any books out of the apartment and if I leave I can’t come back in. Am I obsessed? Actually this is a dream that could turn into a nightmare. However if you could take books out into the world with you and if you could come and go as you please, it might just be perfect.

Amazon

Literature and Fiction

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern  F*

This is Pleasure: A Story by Mary Gaitskill F

On Swift Horses: A Novel by Shannon Pufahl F

Girl, Woman, other: A Novel by Berndine Evaristo F*

The Innocents: A Novel by Michael Crummay F

Find Me: A Novel by André Aciman F

The Revisioners: A Novel by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton F

The Confession Club: A Novel (Mason) by Elizabeth Berg F*

Nothing to See Here by Kevin Wilson  F*

Mary Toft: or The Rabbit Queen: A Novel by Dexter Pullman  F*

Mysteries and Thrillers

The Lost Causes of Beale Creek: A Novel by Rhett McLaughlin, Link Neal

Broken Glass (A Nik Pohl Thriller) by Alexander Hartung and Fiona Beaton

A Christmas Gathering by Anne Perry

Nothing More Dangerous by Allen Eskens

The Family Upstairs: A Novel by Lisa Jewell

Kiss the Girls and Make Them Cry: A Novel by Mary Higgins Clark

The Siberian Dilemma 9 (The Arkady Renko Novels) by Martin Cruz Smith

An Equal Justice (David Adams) by Chad Zunker

A Minute to Midnight by David Baldacci

36 Righteous Men by Steven Pressfield

Nonfiction

Vicksburg: Grant’s Campaign that Broke the Confederacy by Donald L Miller

Valley Forge by Bob Drury and Tom Clavin

Acid for the Children: A Memoir by Flea, Patti Smith *

When the Earth Had Two Moons: Cannibal Planets, Icy Giants, Dirty Comets, Dreadful Orbits, and the Origins of the Night Sky by Erik Asphang

Our Wild Calling: How Connecting with Animals can Transform our Lives and Save Theirs by Richard Louv

The Beautiful Ones by Prince

Hymns of the Republic: The Story of the Final Years of the American Civil War by S. C. Gwynne

Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, the Berlin Wall and the Most Dangerous Place on Earth by Iain McGregor *

Canyon Dreams: A Basketball Season on the Navajo Nation by Michael Powell

The Great Pretender – The Undercover Mission that Changed our Understanding of Madness by Susannah Cahalan *

The Witches Are Coming by Lindy West

User Unfriendly: How the Hidden Rules of Design are Changing the Way We Live, Work and Play by Cliff Kuang with Robert Fabricant

Why Are We Yelling: The Art of Productive Disagreement by 
Buster Benson

Don’t Be Evil: How Big Tech Betrayed its Founding Principles – and all of us by Rana Foroohar

Volume Central: Hearing in a Deafening World by David Owen.

Science Fiction and Fantasy

The Deep by Rivers Solomon and Daveed Diggs

The Pursuit of William Abbey by Claire North

Call Down the Hawk (The Dreamer Trilogy, Bk. 1 by Maggie Stiefvater

Star Wars – Resistance Reborn: The Rise of Skywalker by Rebecca Roanhorse

Made Things by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Fate of the Fallen (Shroud of Prophecy) by Kel Kade

New York Times Book Update

Oct. 4 th

The Topeka School by Ben Lerner F

Sarah Jane by James Sallis – Crime

Bloody Genius by John Sanford – Crime

Gallows Court by Martin Edwards – Crime 

The Bird Boys by Lisa Sandlin – Crime

Cantoras by Carolina De Robertis F

Akin by Emma Donoghue *

Growing Things by Paul Tremblay – Short stories – Horror

The Cabin at the End of the Lane by Paul Tremblay – Horror

Sealed by Naomi Booth – Horror

Nonfiction

Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Gladwell

A State at Any Cost: The Life of David Ben-Gurion by Tom Segev

What was Liberalism? The Past, Present, and Promise of a Noble Idea by James Traub

The Stakes – 2020 and the Survival of American Democracy by Robert Kuttner

The Accusation by Edward Berenson

Scarred by Sarah Edmondson – Nxivm

Super Pumped by Mike Isaac (Uber)

The Anarchy by William Dalrymple

Oct. 11 th

Fiction

The Shadow King by Namwali Serpell

The Sweetest Fruits by Moneque Truong

A Pure Heart by Rajia Hassib

The World that We Knew by Alice Hoffman

A Man in Love by Martin Walser (Göethe)

The Shortlist – Love and War in European Fiction

Country by Michael Hughes

Will and Testament by Vigdis Hjorth

The Girl at the Door by Veronica Raimo

Nonfiction

Transaction Man by Nicholas Lemann

Know My Name by Chanel Miller

The Second Founding by Eric Foner

Beaten Down, Worked Up by Steven Greenhouse

Homesick by Jennifer Croft (Memoir)

Fashionopolis by Dana Thomas

We are the Weather by Jonathan Safran Foer

Syria Secret Library by Mike Thompson

A Polar Affair by Lloyd Spencer Davis (promiscuous penguins)

New York Times does Halloween but I don’t.

Nov. 1 st

The Old Success by Martha Grimes – Crime

Death in Focus by Anne Perry – Crime

Elevator Pitch by Linwood Barclay – Crime

The Quaker by Liam McIlvanney – Crime

Grand Union by Zadie Smith – Short Stories

The World Doesn’t Require You by Rion Amilcar Scott

Fiction

Olive Again by Elizabeth Strout

Girl by Edna O’Brien

Call Upon the Water by Stella Tillyard

Lampedusa by Steven Price

Nonfiction

Edison by Edmund Morris – Bio.

To Build a Better World by Condoleezza Rice and Philip Zelikow

Sontag by Benjamin Moser – Bio.

Who is an Evangelical? by Thomas S. Kidd

The Immoral Majesty by Ben Howe

The Problem with Everything by Meghan Daum

The Economist’s Hour by  Binyamin Appelbaum

The Marginal Revolutionaries by Janek Wasserman

The Shortlist – 3 Memoirs by Famous Women

Inside Out by Demi Moore

Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years by Julie Andrews with Emma Walton Hamilton

Touched by the Sun: My Friendship with Jackie by Carly Simon 

Publisher’s Weekly

Oct. 7 th

Salt Show by Julia Armfield

Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo

Ordinary Hazards: A Memoir by Nikki Grimes

Older Brother by Mahir Guven, trans. from French by Tina Kover Europa

American Radicals: How Nineteenth Century Protest Shaped the Nation by Holly Jackson

How We Fight For Our Lives: A Memoir by Saeed Jones

Passing: A Memoir of Love and Death by Michael Korda

Anti-Social: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation by Andrew Marantz

Tuesday Mooney Talks to Ghosts by Kate Racculia

Cosmosknights: Book One by Hannah Templer

Commute: An Illustrated Memoir of Female Shame by Erin Williams

Oct. 14

Celestial Bodies by Jokha Alharthi trans. from Arabic by Marilyn Booth (Oman) F

Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me by Adrienne Brodeur 

The Body: A Guide for Occupants by Bill Bryson NF

Your House Will Pay by Steph Cha F – based on true case

Life Undercover: Coming of Age in the CIA by Amaryllis Fox Memoir

Music: A Subversive History by Ted Gioia History

One Hundred Autobiographies: A Memoir by David Lehman Memoir

The Adventure of the Peculiar Protocols: Adapted from the Journals of John H. Watson, MD by Nicholas Meyer F

The First Cell: And the Human Cost of Pursuing Cancer to the Last by Azra Razer NF

Salvaged by Madeleine Roux Science Fiction Thriller

It Would Be Night in Caracas by Karina Sainz Borgo trans. from Spanish by Elizabeth Bryer (Caracas, Venezuela) F

Olive Again by Elizabeth Strout

Oct. 21

All This Could Be Yours by Jami Attenberg F *

The Peanut Papers: Writers and Cartoonists on Charlie Brown, Snoopy and the Gang, and the Meaning of Life – Edited by Andrew Blauner (Essays, Poems, Cartoons) (Valentines to Charles M. Schultz)

The Night Fire by Michael Connelly F

The Deserter by Nelson DeMille and Alex DeMille Thriller *

Initiated: Memory of a Witch by Amanda Yates Memoir

Janis: Her Life and Music by Holly George-Warren Biography *

The Family Upstairs by Lisa Jewell Thriller

Edison by Edmund Morris Biography

The Promise by Silvina Ocampo trans. from Spanish by Suzanne Jill Levine and Jessica Powell F

The Fragility of Bodies by Sergio Olguin, trans. from Spanish by Miranda France, Bitter Lemon Crime

The Fountains of Silence by Ruta Sepetys (Franco, Madrid) F

Famous in Cedarville by Erica Wright F

Oct. 28

Blue Moon: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child F

The Lives of Lucien Freud: The Restless Years, 1922-1968 by William Feaver Biography

Overview: A New Perspective of Earth by Benjamin Grant Photos

Blood: A Memoir by Allison Moorer Memoir

Shadow Network: Media, Money and the Secret Hub of the Radical Right by Anne Nelson NF*

The Factory by Hiroko Oyamada, trans from Japanese by David Boyd F

The In-Betweens: The Spiritualists, Mediums, and Legends of Camp Etna by Mira Ptacin NF

Nothing to See Here by Kevin Wilson (humor) F

Nov. 4

The Movie Musical! by Jeanine Bassinger NF

The History of Philosophy by A. C. Grayling NF

Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert (“a contemporary page-turning winner”) F

In the Dream House: A Memoir by Carmen Mava Machado (same sex domestic abuse) Memoir

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern F

The Book of Lost Saints by Daniel Jose Older F

The Arab of the Future 4: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1987-1992 by Riad Sattouf, trans. from Frenchy by Sam Taylor Autobiography *

The Siberian Dilemma by Martin Cruz Smith (Arkady Renko #9) by Thriller

Love Unknown: The Life and Worlds of Elizabeth Bishop by Thomas Travisano Biography and Literary Study

The Dutch House by Ann Patchett – Book

Goodreads.com

The Dutch House by Ann Patchett is a study of a family, an American family. It is a story told by the second child, a boy named Danny. It’s a story about a clueless father and husband who buys his wife a house, a famous house, built with much attention to detail by a wealthy family, the VanHoebeeks,. The ceiling in the dining room is a work of art, literally. The house has a ballroom and a conservatory. Since the sale was an estate sale, all the VanHoebeek’s belongings are still in the house, including portraits of husband and wife over the mantle in the drawing room. Despite all the architectural glories the house has a very small kitchen because the staff would use it, not the family. There is also a pool.

Into this ritzy house Cyril Conroy brings his wife. He bought the house for her as a surprise. At the time they had one child, their daughter Maeve. The house was a source of pride for the husband who was a real estate investor and property manager. But his wife, was appalled by the expensive details. She yearned to dedicate her life to helping the poor. Clive found Elna just as she was preparing to enter a convent, not yet a nun. He whisked her away and married her. We often see our partners in life through cloudy mirrors. We make assumptions that if they love us they must be like us. The Dutch House is a story about misplaced love and misunderstood love. Maeve shoulders all the responsibilities of these selfish parents when the family falls apart. Some people should never have children. She yearns for what they lost, the family and the house and the hired women who took care of them, Fluffy, Sandy, and Jocelyn. Maeve is obsessed and cannot move on with her own life. 

Although this is a story of a family, and of loss and reunion, even more it is a story of a house. If you have ever given a home and your heart to cats you know that some cats fall in love with people, but some cats fall in love with houses. How do Maeve and her brother lose The Dutch House and then get it back? Although nothing earthshaking happens, there are plenty of repercussions. What stories are more interesting than stories about families? Take your pick, but I will usually enjoy a good family saga by any writer as skilled as Ann Patchett. This book will probably be made into a movie, but doesn’t even have to be made into a movie because it already creates one in your mind.

The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates – Book

From a Google Image Search -CBS


The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates – Book

For me, it’s official, Mr. Coates can write. In The Water Dancer, Ta-Nehisi Coates proves he can write fiction that is just as deep and accessible as his nonfiction. In The Water Dancer he writes about slavery (which he calls the Task) and abolitionists and the Underground, a subject that has had some good authorial attention in recent years. But, although the movement is present in the story, for Coates it is the people affected by slavery, the families torn apart, the histories lost, that matter. It is the inspirational struggles to create new family ties and to hold on to traditions, even if they had to be formed anew in a strange and terrible land.

Virginia is the state where the Lockless plantation tries to maintain an idle lifestyle, maintain a genteel veneer which rests on the shoulders of those who are tasked to do anything that might even vaguely be considered work. Every white person even has a personal maid or valet, a slave, who bathes them, grooms them, and dresses them. 

These white plantation owners were supposed to be farmers but they were so greedy and so tied to the payouts from their tobacco crops that they refused to believe that the crops they depended on were depleting the land they were planted in. Some of those who “tasked” on the land understood what was happening but either no one listened or, as the land produced less income, those who understood the land and the crops were sold away south and west – to Natchez and beyond. Slaves really were sold away to Natchez but Coates also uses Natchez as a symbol for family separation, for sorrow, for harsher conditions, for loss. 

Plantation owners, slave owners, sold off the most valuable “taskers” first so the family members who remained were left without the strongest among them, perhaps the most characterful, and the older slaves who kept the stories of celebrations and family ties alive. Sorrow that is never given time to abate collects and turns “the task” into a sadder, even more burdensome duty to preserve a failing white lifestyle even as the “taskers” see the community of their own, that they have been able to create in their captivity, disintegrate daily into grief and tearful good-byes.

Hiram Walker is a mixed-race son of Howell Walker, who also has a son by his white wife. Hiram who finds a home on the Street where the “tasked” live, a home with Thena, a women he is not related to, is a child with an excellent memory. He remembers every detail of what he sees and hears. But he cannot remember his mama. He knows her name is Rose. He knows she was a water dancer. He has seen her dancing in a vision on a bridge. A water dancer can dance joyfully and gracefully with an earthenware jar full of water on her head and not spill a drop. He knows his mother was a beauty, and he knows she had a sister, Emma – also a water dancer – because his “adopted” people have told him so. But where his own memories of his mother should be there is a hole.

Hiram also has a special talent. He can conduct himself across distances without being seen. In a land where no slave can walk off the land of his/her “master” without a pass, and where running away can be punished by near death (slaves are valuable property and so are rarely killed outright), someone who can “conduct” himself unseen has a very great gift indeed. But Hiram cannot control his talent and this is somehow related to what he does not remember about his mother. His love for another Lockless slave, Sophia, has grown over the years and it allows him to also accept and love her mixed-race child. Hiram needs to learn how to control his talent so that he can take the two women he loves and the child to freedom in the North.

Whether or not Hiram learns to control “conduction” and how he uses it is at the heart of this story but for me toil and survival, family and heritage; anger and sorrow and the mistaken idea that one person can “own” another – these things are the true heart and soul of this story. Conduction is part of an almost-lost origin story which never died even though the people the story belonged to were kidnapped, abused and held without freedom (in a land that supposedly treasured freedom).

I happen to be reading the Frederick Douglass biography by David Blight at the same time as I am reading Coates’ novel. These two book pair very well and one book seems to riff on the other. If white folks ever hope to understand not just why slavery was wrong but how the repercussions of this aberrant human behavior will echo forever in the souls and families of our fellow Americans of African Descent then The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates should add depth to your quest for understanding. I cannot speak to how black and brown people experience Coates’ novel but I hope to get exposure to some of their reactions.